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dc.creatorDominguez, Jonah
dc.creatorRaković, Marko
dc.creatorLi, Donglai
dc.creatorPollock, Henry
dc.creatorLawson, Shelby
dc.creatorNovčić, Ivana
dc.creatorSu, Xiangting
dc.creatorZeng, Qisha
dc.creatorAl-Dhufari, Roqaya
dc.creatorJohnson-Cadle, Shanelle
dc.creatorBoldrick, Julia
dc.creatorChamberlain, Mac
dc.creatorHauber, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2023-12-19T08:04:39Z
dc.date.available2023-12-19T08:04:39Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.issn1744-957X
dc.identifier.urihttp://rimsi.imsi.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/3074
dc.description.abstractAlarm signals have evolved to communicate pertinent threats to conspecifics, but heterospecifics may also use alarm calls to obtain social information. In birds, mixed-species flocks are often structured around focal sentinel species, which produce reliable alarm calls that inform eavesdropping heterospecifics about predation risk. Prior research has shown that Neotropical species innately recognize the alarm calls of a Nearctic sentinel species, but it remains unclear how generalizable or consistent such innate signal recognition of alarm-calling species is. We tested for the responses to the alarm calls of a Neotropical sentinel forest bird species, the dusky-throated antshrike (Thamnomanes ardesiacus), by naive resident temperate forest birds across three continents during the winter season. At all three sites, we found that approaches to the Neotropical antshrike alarm calls were similarly frequent to the alarm calls of a local parid sentinel species (positive control), while approaches to the antshrike’s songs and to non-threatening columbid calls (negative controls) occurred significantly less often. Although we only tested one sentinel species, our findings indicate that temperate forest birds can recognize and adaptively respond globally to a foreign and unfamiliar tropical alarm call, and suggest that some avian alarm calls transcend phylogenetic histories and individual ecological experiences.sr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherThe Royal Societysr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/inst-2020/200053/RS//sr
dc.relationNational Science Foundation grant (grant no. 1953226 to M.E.H.)sr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/inst-2020/200178/RS//sr
dc.relationProjects of Liaoning Provincial Department of Education (grant no. LJKZ0093)sr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceBiology letterssr
dc.subjectalarm callsr
dc.subjectavian mixed-species flockssr
dc.subjectvocalizationsr
dc.subjectheterospecific eavesdroppingsr
dc.subjectavian alarm callssr
dc.subjectsentinel speciessr
dc.titleWhat’s the rumpus? Resident temperate forest birds approach an unfamiliar neotropical alarm call across three continentssr
dc.typearticlesr
dc.rights.licenseBYsr
dc.citation.spage20230332
dc.citation.volume19
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2023.0332
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://rimsi.imsi.bg.ac.rs/bitstream/id/8073/bitstream_8073.pdf
dc.type.versionacceptedVersionsr


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