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dc.creatorDjordjević, Branislav
dc.creatorMastilović, Sreten
dc.creatorSedmak, Aleksandar
dc.creatorDimic, Aleksandar
dc.creatorKljajin, Milan
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-14T08:27:15Z
dc.date.available2026-01-01
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.issn0013-7944
dc.identifier.urihttp://rimsi.imsi.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2199
dc.description.abstractThe phenomenon of ductile-to-brittle transition in ferritic steels has been a ubiquitous research challenge for the last 50 years. The characterization of this problem using the fracture mechanics concept, from the earliest studies based on the linear-elastic fracture mechanics to the application of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, has become inevitable over time. The fracture toughness is not an intrinsic material property but depends on geometrical factors (such as the specimen shape, thickness, and surface roughness), defect type and distribution, loading mode, and environmental conditions. The pronounced scatter of experimental data on fracture toughness, characteristic of all ferritic steels in the ductile-tobrittle transition temperature region, necessitated the use of statistical methods for data processing. That approach, which emerged in the 1970s, can still be found today as the basis for interpreting fracture toughness data in ductile-to-brittle transition problems. This paper presents a brief historical overview of such studies along with the problems that have arisen as a consequence of using fracture mechanics concepts, such as constraint effects, as an example. In the time-honored research tradition, all the proposed methods and models, as well as their criticisms, provided the basis for the development of new approaches to the ductile-to-brittle characterization of ferritic steels. Specifically, these include size effects and scaling of geometrically similar samples, with the aim of predicting material behavior beyond experimental limits. Brief outlines of two new approaches are provided in this succinct review. The criticisms of all presented methods are oriented mostly on the application domain, as well as their capability to predict fracture toughness, with short overview of their most conspicuous advantages and disadvantages.sr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherElseviersr
dc.rightsembargoedAccesssr
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceEngineering Fracture Mechanicssr
dc.subjectductile-to-brittle transitionsr
dc.subjectfracture toughnesssr
dc.subjectferritic steelsr
dc.subjectfracture mechanicssr
dc.subjectstatistical modelingsr
dc.titleDuctile-to brittle transition of ferritic steels: A historical sketch and some recent trendssr
dc.typearticlesr
dc.rights.licenseBY-NC-NDsr
dc.citation.issue109716
dc.citation.volume293
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.engfracmech.2023.109716
dc.type.versionacceptedVersionsr


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